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Discussion About New England Patriots Signing Michael Floyd Has Been All Wrong

There has been a lot of negative media attention surrounding the #NEPatriots signing of Michael Floyd given his arrest for drunk driving in Arizona, and his release by the Cardinals.
 
I recognize that the guy has a problem, and a past history of alcohol problems. I do not excuse it, or minimize the danger of what he has done in any way shape or form.
 
And yeah, I also recognize that the Pats need a receiver.
 
But does the fact that Floyd made a horrible decision that could have killed people, including himself mean he should never work again? Should the Pats be portrayed just as a greedy, heartless business hoping to use Michael Floyd for his talents and then discard him? Do we need to celebrate organizations or companies that cut players for mistakes they make?
 
In my view, there is another element to this story that has been missing: What is being done to help Michael Floyd succeed and turn his life around?
 
Photo Credit: John Wilcox - Wide receiver #14 Michael Floyd warms up for Patriots practice at Gillette.We all know the Patriots knew about his problems. They also signed him, because they want him to be successful. The Pats don’t sign people to join in their Super Bowl journey, because they want them to screw up MORE. So, instead of just writing or talking about what we ALL already know (the video, his BAH, possibly 45 days of jail time, etc), why not dive into what the Patriots are doing to help him?
 
This organization has a reputation of taking in all kinds of players, and using their system and culture to do things that no one else has done. People talk about “The Patriot Way” and following their model of success. In a league where athletes are dealing with drugs, alcohol, head injuries, etc – maybe there is something this team is doing to help Michael Floyd that would be reason to applaud? For other teams – other companies to learn from?
 
Alcoholism is a serious disease that affects many people – many of whom do not even realize they are alcoholics. It would be nice if we could turn our attention away from ridicule and indictment, and focus on how people and organizations are delivering treatment and support.